Compliance (2012)

Compliance (2012) Poster

Written & Directed by Craig Zobel

Craig Zobels “inspired by true events” Sundance film festival film stars Dreama Walker as an unfortunate fast food employee whose world gets turned upside down when a prank call leads to her 19 year old character, Becky, having the worst shift of her life. Although I am an advocate of no spoilers, I have to warn you that this film can be disturbing to some audiences, having watched it with my housemates and viewing the different shocked reactions, ranging from confused laughter to researching actual events, Compliance is not a film to be entered into watching lightly.

It can be quite a difficult film to watch at times due to Zobels choice in cinematic features. His choice to almost play out the events in real time means that you will need a lot of patience to watch this film, but it is worth it in the end, you truly feel the humiliation of Becky through the length of time she was put through this ordeal. The combination of long takes and revelation of the prank caller to the audience but not the characters gives that sense of dramatic irony, us knowing it is a prank call, waiting, wishing that they would just realise. I myself got really involved with the film. I think the fact that it is based on true events, makes it seem even more painful to watch but, as one of my housemates put it, you literally just can’t stop watching.

There are a few Kubrickian and Tarantino elements in it, but as a massive fan of both directors I seem to find that in everything. The opening credits of block capitals seems Kubrickian although can also be compared to the start of Cabin in the Woods, and the constant food shots reminds me of some Tarantino films, specifically the recent Django: Unchained. The food shots also prolong the film and humiliation, the constant reminder that this is all happening in the back rooms of a fast food restaurant just makes it seem even more … dirty. Although there is nudity there is nothing sexual about it, again this all adds to the humiliation we feel for Becky, and, although some sexual events are included in the story, nothing is shown, just suggested by innuendo shots to do with food and drink, they are so subtle and not absolutely necessary to the story ,at the time, as a more extensive explanation is given in an investigation part of the narrative at the end, to the point where one person I was watching it with actually asked aloud what was going on. It’s effective though, it gives those who are able to handle it the fuller picture and for those who aren’t, they can overlook it. I suppose dividing the audience into different character camps, those oblivious to the events like the manager and those who know full well what’s going on, like some of the other employees, allows us to know what the characters, outside the main story, are feeling. This is emphasised at the end where a televised interview is given, which I am guessing is a replica of a real one.

Throughout the film, us as an audience are asking “how can they believe this?”, “how did they not know?” which is exactly what the public asked. An explanation is almost given through the mention of the Milgram experiment at the start of the film. For those who didn’t do A Level psychology, it was an experiment in which the influence of an authority figure was tested on the participants’ willingness to inflict pain on other subjects. It has now since been deemed and unethical but gained the result of a majority being able to inflict pain if they are not directly responsible for it. This is explored through this film, and the real life result is scary.

My recommendation is to set aside some time to watch this film, you can’t really watch it half-heartedly. Compliance will no doubt give you food for thought for days and, disturbing as it is, this analysis of human compliance is a must watch for any film lover. The bold choices of Zobel in his topic for this film and expectations of his audience makes it not only enjoyable but slightly enlightening. You will come away from the screening with a lot more knowledge about human nature than, maybe, you would like to.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

 

Written & Directed by Stanley Kubrick

Based on Anthony Burgess’ novel, A Clockwork Orange

A Clockwork Orange, directed by Stanley Kubrick, was the centre of much controversy when it was released in 1971. This meant that it was withdrawn from distribution and was released in the UK over 20 years later. Stanley Kubrick’s approach to directing is described as a “self-conscious approach to filmic story telling … [which] demanded an equally self-conscious spectator” this is obvious in this film which is, in itself, conscious of being an art form shown in such scenes as the opening scene.

The mixture of electronic and orchestral music played in the background of the opening scene establishes the film as almost futuristic but with Kubrick’s view on contemporary Britain. The establishing shot introduces the protagonist, Alex, staring straight at the audience, fearless, the leader of his “droogs”. Crime and Beethoven is his world, which is soon turned upside down with his droogs turning on him resulting in him spending time in jail and leading to an experimental rehabilitation treatment in which, it seems, Beethoven turns on him too. Kubrick’s view of the youth of that time is shown, although Alex is seen as immoral, the film will be from his point of view, and so Kubrick can be seen as sympathetic towards these youths as he is encouraging the audience to see their view of the world by making Alex the narrator of the story. Not forgetting Kubrick’s famous bathroom scene, later on in the film, which links both back to one of the first crimes we see Alex commit and directly to the ending of the film.

There seems to be no clear genre for A Clockwork Orange as it has been described as an “ultra- violent” film which is a term taken from the film suggesting it is a completely new genre of film. The term suggests a cross between a film about the nightlife culture of the time, due to the play on the words “ultra violet”, and a crime film. Another attempt at naming the genre of this film is “dystopian” which suggests an element of a zeitgeist of distrusting both the government and the youths of that time. The most commonly used genre that this film is put into is “art-house” which isn’t as much of a description of the film as the kind of audience it has, due to the fact that art house films generally have niche audiences.

One of my favourite films of all times and one of the most controversial, A Clockwork Orange is a must see for any film lover. Whether you love it as much as me or you are appalled by the graphic violence, you are bound to have an opinion.

First Post ..

stanley-kubrick-great-director

Hi Guys!

So I’ve decided to start my own film review blog, seeing as I have about a million opinions and don’t know what to do with them

I’m going to have to tweak a few things before I post anything else but I thought I’d try and get it started.

So I’ll be reviewing/ analysing anything from a personal favourite Kubrick film to a film I’ve just seen at the cinema.

If you have any recommendations or anything feel free to let me know and I’ll try my best to watch and write a post about it.

To be honest this is mainly a way to voice my opinion on a film without annoying my friends and family =) (I talk about films a lot)

So my first post should be up in a few days and I’ll try to post a few a week from now on.